Of ‘some spoiled, bored god’

Of ‘some spoiled, bored god’

As my millions of readers will be aware, okay, all three of you, I am not only interested in writing adventure fantasy with a strong realistic political element but also playing the guitar.

One of my favourite artists, and I use the word properly here, is a man called Jon Gomm. To see the sublime skill of this man have a look here, ‘Passionflower’. Placed on YouTube in September 2011, it has over 17.5 million views as at October 2020. I go back to it every so often just to listen to the music, the words and I continue marvel at the man’s passion, artistry and skill.

So why am I mentioning Jon Gomm? Well, as at 15 October, 2020, he has a new album out, ‘The Faintest Idea’, one of the tracks is called ‘Dream Factories’. The quote below resonated on a number of levels which, once you’ve read it, you’ll understand.

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About Dream Factories: Gigs are my safe place. To be in a room with someone giving their most direct expression of their secret selves. Sharing that with an audience in blissful, reverent communion, whether of peace or chaos. It’s sacred.

Pop Idol. The X Factor. [Your Country]’s Got Talent. The Voice. I hate them. They take my place of safety and love and reduce it to a place of fear and judgement. They take a kid who loves to sing. Tell them – You’ve got 60 seconds to make your dreams come true. Fail and it’s back to irrelevance. So they sing, eyes wide with terror and hope. And a celebrity hands down their judgement, like some spoiled, bored god.

It’s the perfect example of how everything is commodified: Not just music, but us and our lives, our dreams – it’s all taken, remade and sold back to us. Whether or not you enjoy this pop song, appreciate the fact that nobody told you to.

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Now, let us just define a couple of words.

Commodify (in British English), to treat something inappropriately as if it can be acquired or marketed like other commodities.

Democracy is a system of government in which people choose their rulers by voting for them in elections.

Let’s consider what is happening to democracy, to our politics. Let’s consider the commodification of politics, the lies, the showmanship of these spoiled, bored gods, masquerading as strong leaders. Instant media, (lower your heads in shame, Twitter and Facebook,) are undermining democracy by commodifying it. They are enabling populists to create ‘a place of fear and judgement’. In fact, a world of fear and judgement.

Democracy should not be treated in this way. Our hopes and dreams should not be treated in this way. One day, people will realise they have been lied to, commodified. Once this happens reconstruction of democracy needs to take place, repaired, made relevant. No matter the cost, repaired and made relevant it must be. First on the list is a proper voting system.

Not First Past The Post as we have in the UK, (December 2019 Election: 43.6% of the vote – 80 seat majority.)

Not the Electoral College as they have in the US. (Three million more votes won by the ‘loser’ in 2016 than the ‘winner’ of the Electoral College.)

Making democracy real means making everyone’s vote real. That these systems need a reboot is without doubt if democracy is to mean anything. It cannot and must not be commodified. Ever.

No one left behind ‘ 

J J Mitchell.

Macavity, the mystery cat

Macavity, the mystery cat

A short post this.

One of the first pieces of advice that I took to heart when I began writing fantasy was to read. Read different genres. Read and, well, just read everything that caught your fancy. Great advice.

Well, I’ve been writing fantasy for a few years now. Using the Kold Kronicles to comment on the world of politics, elites, their financial and ethical shenanigans and so on. Recently I came across Macavity, the mystery cat. Made me smile and think of the world today.

It’s a great poem and worth reading. It chimes because it can be read to children – I can imagine them enthralled if you read it the right way, i.e. full of drama, shifty eyes and long pauses, you get the picture.

For the adults in the room, you can draw your own parallels with our world today. The first four lines of the last verse may particularly resonate: 

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like Macavity,
There never was a Cat of such deceitfulness and suavity.
He always has an alibi, and one or two to spare:
At whatever time the deed took place—MACAVITY WASN’T THERE !

Remind you of anyone? Or two?

‘ No one left behind’

J J Mitchell

For your tomorrow…

For your tomorrow…

The British Fourteenth Army played a significant part in defeating Japan, and on Saturday, 15 August 2020, the world commemorated the 75th anniversary of VJ Day, aka, Victory over Japan day when on that date Imperial Japan surrendered to the Allied Powers. The surrender was formally signed on 2 September, 1945.

Commanded by Lieutenant-General Slim, the British Fourteenth Army were a mixed bunch comprising British and Indian Army as well as West and East African troops in addition to Karen hill tribes. It was also known as ‘The Forgotten Army’, due to the world’s focus on the European as well as the Pacific theatres of war rather than the Burma Campaign.

A particularly vicious battle was that at Kohima, the capital of Nagaland in northeast India. This raged from 5 April to 22 June, 1944. Fighting was savage with no quarter given or taken, many times hand-to-hand. The weather and the land, especially during the monsoon, were unforgiving.

Did I say they were a mixed bunch? Y’know, white skinned, dark skinned…

Fighting alongside each other.

For each other.

The monument to the dead of Kohima is simple, ‘When you go home, tell them of us and say: ‘For your tomorrow, we gave our today.’

No matter the odds, they never gave up. 

We can learn from that.

No one left behind

J J Mitchell

Prescience

Prescience

As a writer of fantasy, I consider prescience an interesting word – ‘the fact of knowing something in advance; foreknowledge.’  I’ve met people who are prescient.  I’ve read prescient articles on what the future may hold which has come to pass.

One of the most prescient I’ve watched recently is on Youtube: shorturl.at/jHLM1  All of it is well worth watching, especially about 15 minutes in for roughly seven minutes or so.

It’s the 125th Stanford Commencement address to the graduating class on 12 June, 2016 by Ken Burn, the documentary film maker.  This was around the time when the current tenant in the White House was about to become the Republican nominee.  By the way, Burn doesn’t mention the individual’s name once.  After talking about the role of government and those who aspire to office, he says:

… asking this man to assume the highest office in the land would be like asking a newly minted car driver to fly a 747.

With his knowledge of history, Burn has seen this type of figure arise many times and in many places throughout history. He warned that the reality TV star presents:

… an incipient proto-fascism, a nativist anti-immigrant Know Nothingism, a disrespect for the judiciary, the prospect of women losing authority over their own bodies, African-Americans again asked to go to the back of the line, voter suppression gleefully promoted, jingoistic sabre-rattling, a total lack of historical awareness, a political paranoia that, predictably, points fingers, always making the other wrong.  These are all virulent strains that have at times infected us in the past.  But they now loom in front of us again – all happening at once.  We know from our history books that these are the diseases of ancient and now fallen empires.  The sense of commonwealth, of shared sacrifice, of trust, so much a part of American life, is eroding fast, spurred along and amplified by an amoral Internet that permits a lie to circle the globe three times before the truth can get started.

Ken Burn warned the students what was going to happen, many applauded.  Others sat there glum of face, some glowering, disbelieving.  I wonder how they feel now? How do you feel now?

Interesting word, prescience, isn’t it?

Especially when it becomes a reality. 

No one left behind

J J Mitchell

A riot is the language of the unheard

A riot is the language of the unheard

There’s a saying, (it’s also a curse), ‘May you live in interesting times’.  Hmm, well, we’re certainly experiencing that at the moment aren’t we?  So much going on, so much frustration with the status quo; so much frustration with inequality of opportunity be it health, education, whatever.  People feel the system is unfair and their concerns ignored, in sum, they are the unheard. 

According to the Pew Research Centre, the income inequality gap in the US has never been wider – the bottom 50% of Americans have just 1% of the nation’s wealth, the top 10% has 70%. 

None of this is new, however, it’s just that it has recently become more obvious.  But there again, you knew that didn’t you? 

In 1967, Martin Luther King, MLK, gave a speech at Stanford, entitled, ‘The Other America’.  You can read it here: https://bit.ly/38q0d8F  (The page also provides a link to YouTube.)  Keep in mind this was in 1967, over half a century ago. Think about that for a moment, over half a century ago…  

Like all great speeches, it is still powerful; it still resonates;  it still applies.  It’s a long speech but worth the time.  MLK ranges far and wide, talking about lack of opportunity in America, especially if your skin is black.  It is the speech in which he says, ‘A riot is the language of the unheard.’ 

In the same speech, MLK also said, ‘Social justice and progress are the absolute guarantors of riot prevention.’  Yep, that works for me as well.  Remember, half a century ago… 

In the US we have the current resident of the WH pouring petrol on an already volatile situation.  No leadership or listening to the unheard there, or in Brazil, or Hungary or Poland.  In Russia, Putin is now in power until 2036 after a somewhat, to put it mildly, questionable referendum.  In Hong Kong, China has imposed a ‘security’ lockdown on political disagreement breaking the treaty it had with the UK in the process. 

All of the above have one thing in common, the creation of the unheard.  All are creating groups who may feel they need to go ‘underground’ to survive.  All are storing up a pressure that will, one day, make itself heard again.  It will appear to have come out of nowhere, but it will happen.  They will be heard. 

Let’s just hope it doesn’t take another fifty years, eh?

J J Mitchell
No one left behind

A sea of humanity with just one message

A sea of humanity with just one message

Interesting times, interesting times.

Some time ago a guy called Nassim Nicholas Taleb wrote about what he called black swan events.  Putting it into my own language, it’s about an event that appears to come out of nowhere and bites you on the arse.  Okay, okay, he didn’t put it quite like that, he was far more elegant, but you get the picture.  Post event, those impacted by the black swan rationalise why it was bound to happen and invariably say  ‘we should have seen that coming.’  Black swans invariably lead to tipping points when things take a completely different direction to what existed before.

I’ve used the ‘black swan’ term myself in the past when working with those involved in an offshore incident. In the main, folk sensed something wasn’t quite right but due to operational imperatives, lack of time or resources didn’t do anything about it and carried on.  Then the black swan swooped down and landed, (apparently out of nowhere), and all hell was let loose – and their arse was bitten.  A tipping point was created.

Here are some figures for you: in the UK young black men are nine times more likely to be jailed than young white men;  three times more likely to be tasered;  six to nine times more likely to be stopped and searched by police.  Oh, and whilst black people account for just three percent of the UK population, they make up 12% of the prison population. 

In the US, African Americans have it even worse, the most recent killing being a case in point – George Floyd, killed on 25 May by Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin.  That the current occupant of the White House has added fuel to the fire is no surprise.  This is the man described by former Speaker of the House of Commons, John Bercow on BBC Any Questions recently, as ‘The most rancid, racist and repellant occupant of the White House in my lifetime.’  Couldn’t have put it better myself.

As for police killing black men in the US. Just put that into a web search, the numbers may not surprise you.

Now, Floyd’s killing by Chauvin was videoed. It went viral. The oxygen thief in the WH must have thought it would soon blow over.  Many others in his circle would have felt the same.  And this is where the black swan element comes in – it didn’t blow over.  The black swan landed.  A tipping point.  In landing, the black swan uncorked a rage, a fury that was intense in its feeling of justice denied. 

I’m reminded of a quote from former slave Frederik Douglass, (1817 – 1895): ‘Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organised conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass’ published in 1845 is well worth reading.  It still resonates as do many of his quotes. Look up, ‘What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July?’  The rest of the quote is searing, to put it mildly. And justified. And relevant – to those disenfranchised by society due to the colour of their skin; their belief system; sexual orientation; race; poverty; education, and so on and so on…

This particular black swan has been circling for decades.  There have been times when it appears to have landed due to the killing of a black man by the police, but it merely continued to circle.  So when Officer Chauvin killed George Floyd, perhaps those who are equally rancid, racist and repellant thought nothing would come of it.  How wrong they were.  It landed.  One can only hope that a tipping point has been created that will unleash the change that is so necessary.

The heading of this blog says it all, there is a sea of humanity with just one message – enough now, enough now. For those who believe this will blow over, I will merely quote a verse of Maya Angelou’s ’Still I rise’.

You may shoot me with your words,


You may cut me with your eyes,


You may kill me with your hatefulness,


But still, like air,

I’ll rise.’

J J Mitchell
No one left behind