Interesting thing aggression…

Interesting thing aggression…

Interesting thing aggression.  In fiction, the hero, invariably a male, takes out the ‘bad guys’, five or six at a time in about five minutes or less.  That his cardio vascular fitness lasts that long is always a wonder to me.  Try swinging a broad sword for longer than three minutes in a simulated battle and you’ll see what I mean. Knackered.  Take on five people at a time rather than running away and, unless it’s a film, they’ll attack you all at once and you’ll go down.  Then the kicking begins.

During Boudica’s war against the Romans, like a number of British tribes, the Iceni had small, two man chariots comprising the driver and a warrior.  Pre-dating cavalry, the chariots would race up to the enemy and javelins, along with other pointy things, would be thrown.  The aim was to break the ranks and create mayhem and confusion.  They would wheel around and drive away, or, the warrior might jump down and engage in violence and general unpleasantness.  This might last about three minutes or so, maybe slightly longer, and then the driver would race back.  The warrior would leap on board and away they would go.  This would allow the warrior time to recover because doing violence at that level is knackering.  Then they’d go back and do the same thing again.  Alternatively, if the driver saw his warrior in trouble he would come back earlier.  It was all about controlled aggression.

More recently, some of the people I know who have been trained in controlled aggression, prefer to fight from a distance, using long barrelled weapons and so on.  Oh, and in greater numbers than the enemy.  ‘It’s safer, and means we can run away if it turns naughty,’ was one comment.  They knew about controlled aggression and used it effectively.  They are also some of the most peace loving people I know.  They know the cost of violence.

I also find it interesting that the most aggressive people tend to be those who hide behind the anonymity of Facebook or Twitter.  So very brave, so very aggressive.  However, they’re bullies, and like most bullies, if one was able to confront them in person, their anonymity lost, they would deflate.

Then there are the political bullies.  They are the ones who confuse aggression with being assertive, with being leaders.  They use their position to bully those who have the temerity to question them.  I don’t need to say who they are, you’ll have your own ideas.

The problem with aggression is that in our current situation regarding the Covid-19 pandemic, the virus doesn’t give a hoot, (polite version).  It has no ego to be intimidated, it has one simple aim – infection with the bonus of killing people if it can.

Controlled aggression requires never giving the virus the chance to spread; to bring people along with you; to make sure that those who break the rules are brought to justice and made to pay for their selfish transgressions.  New Zealand is a great example of controlled aggression.  From the off, they went in hard.

The problem is that the bloviate leadership we are seeing currently, populists all, can only peddle aggression.  Uncontrolled and bullying aggression.  And that’s why they’ll fail. 

But at what cost?  That’s what we should be asking ourselves.  How many have died unnecessarily?  Let us not confuse aggression with leadership.  Let us not confuse aggression with effectiveness.  Let us simply make those using aggression accountable for the damage they have done and will continue to do until they are replaced.

Interesting thing aggression, it can end up killing you.  But never them… 

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

Reset

Reset

Well, here we are, so many weeks into a lockdown due to Covid-19. We’re reliant on NHS workers, all of them. The cleaners, the admin staff and those tending the sick. We’re also reliant on the folk who work in supermarkets, delivery drivers, the council employees who mend the roads, collect the waste from our homes, the unsung heroes, all of them doing a job that if they stopped, well, it wouldn’t be pleasant would it?

So, let’s reset what we say and think about what’s been considered ‘normal’ for the last twenty years or so. Let’s think again. Key word that – think. As is reset…

Let’s reset some of the bovine comments we’ve heard in the past about ‘people coming over here, taking our jobs.’ ‘Taking our jobs?’ Really?

Do those making these comments mean the people ‘taking our jobs’ who are working in the NHS? So far the death toll of NHS workers is in excess of 60. Looking at their names and backgrounds, it’s clear a significant number didn’t originate in the UK. Coming over here, ‘taking our jobs’ and then letting themselves die trying to save their patients. So inconsiderate.

Let’s also ignore the 60,000+ non-UK born NHS personnel who come from within the EU and elsewhere. You know, that organisation that’s full of heroes, yes that one. The workers who would have had to leave the UK soon had Covid-19 not happened.

Reset? Definitely.

Let’s reset society’s attitude towards what is known as the ‘unskilled’. Y’know, those ‘unskilled’, traditionally poorly paid and generally ignored people who work in the care sector. The ‘unskilled’ staff of one care home who have moved into camper vans so they can continue to look after their charges. Volunteering to do this although it means they will not see their families for weeks, if not months.

Reset? Yep.

What else do we need to reset.  There’s so much…

Our attitude to work – reset. 

Travel – reset.

Communication of all kinds – reset.

Politics – reset.

You’ll have your own – reset.

We must keep in mind that to reset we need to analyse and review. This will take time and must not be rushed. However, returning to what existed before, returning to what was once considered ‘normal’ is not, and should not, be acceptable. It was this version of ‘normal’ that caused the problem in the first place.

Reset? Hell, yes. End of. 

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

 

Let’s have some balance here

Let’s have some balance here

Well, what a world we’re living in, eh?  In the UK, until the general election on 12 December 2019 where 43% of the vote resulted in an 80 seat majority for the winning party, everything prior to that was about Brexit.

Here we are now, coming up four months into this Government’s ‘rule’ and Brexit is hardly mentioned.  It will be again believe me, but just not for the moment.

We have had floods, front page for a while and now hardly remembered, and now Corona virus, aka COVID-19.

The media are going wild, seemingly enjoying the tensions they are raising by their coverage of this virus.  ‘Death Ship’ was one of the ‘best’ I read recently.  It was about an elderly passenger with previous medical issues who had left a cruise ship some weeks before, and had died due to COVID-19.  Death Ship? Really?

You can almost imagine the morning meeting in some of these so-called responsible rags with the Editor saying, ‘Okay, folks, as we all know, readership has been dropping for some time now and marketing has told me that we can increase sales by mentioning Corona virus on the front page and the following seven.  What’s that, Boris?  Corona beer?  No you idiot, Corona virus, y’know, that thing that’s killing millions of people.’

Except that it’s not, killing millions of people that is.  A quick look at the research, (and not just one source), confirms this.  In comparison to SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome), COVID-19 is likely more highly transmissible but not as deadly.

SARS had a Case Fatality Rate, CFR, of 9.6%; MERS a CFR of 34.4%.  Since the end of December 2019 and as of 9 March 2020, there have been 109,695 cases of COVID-19 reported including 3,811 deaths.

In the majority of the research reports, the CFR for COVID-19 is 2.3% with older age and acute respiratory distress syndrome correlated with mortality.

Yes, it’s horrible, and yes, disruptive, and yes, causing financial and social mayhem.  But it’s not helped by the lack of balance I’m seeing in many news providers or those low-lifes who exist in the foetid swamps of Facebook and Twitter.  There are also some who think it’s part of a plot by, (just put your own prejudice here – religion, race, sexual orientation, skin colour, oh, the list can go on, and on, and on…)  The current incumbent in the White House comes to mind with some of his recent rants.

So, let’s have some balance here.  COVID-19 will pass.  Some outcomes of this virus will be very, very unpleasant.  However, the world will move on.  The decency and caring that is the usual approach to challenges faced by the people I have in my life, and mirrored in countless others, will remain.  They’re balanced, they’re caring, and they’re very human.  We will all move on.

To repeat, let’s have some balance here.  Shit happens, okay?  It’s how this particular challenge is dealt with that will define us.

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

 

Know thy power and use it

Know thy power and use it

Interesting thing, power.  

Many moons ago I analysed, changed if necessary, a number of organisations, teams and individuals.   What I found really interesting was that the teams and organisations that were the most effective were invariably lead by those who didn’t want the role, the power.  Think about that for a moment, the leaders didn’t want the role but, as one person put it to me, ‘I had to step up or else we’d have gone down the tubes.  People would have lost their jobs, and I just couldn’t allow that to happen.  It wasn’t right, so I took the job.’  

Obviously I’m drawing a parallel between the current Prime Minister of the UK and his even more dysfunctional equivalent in the White House.  Even as a child, Johnson talked about wanting to be ‘King of the World.’  Both Johnson and Trump lied, coarsened debate, created hatred and division, obfuscated, bloviated and blustered their way to their current role.  Both put into power by out of date and undemocratic processes.  In the case of Johnson, voted into the role of the Conservative leader by 0.09% of the population, aka, the Conservative and Unionist Party membership.  Then, with 43% of the popular vote, his party achieved 53% of the seats with an 80 seat majority.  In the US, due to the Electoral College, the winner of the popular vote by over three million votes lost to the person who currently sits behind the Resolute desk.  Democracy, donchajustlurvit?  

Then let’s add that it took on average 38,264 votes to elect a Tory MP and 50,835 per Labour MP.  It’s even worse for the smaller political parties.  That First Past The Post is past its sell by date is confirmed yet again.  As is the Electoral College in the US.  However, interested parties, and all are complicit in both the UK and US, seem unable or unwilling to move away from a process that is patently undemocratic.  Democracy, donchajustlurvit?  

As for democracy, to those who complain about there being too many elections, people died to provide you with the right to vote;  to those who decided not to vote, you have abrogated the right to complain about what is happening;  to those who did vote and want to do something about confronting what has happened, then plan.  Yes, of course there will be frustration, anger, some will be in despair.  Well, enough now.  Breath deep, smile and remember that this too shall soon pass.  And plan.  

To use a quote I read in a recent Big Issue, ‘when evil people plot, good people plan.’  We have seen the plotting, the iron control of the message from both Johnson and Trump.  Their respective parties now mirror their own dysfunctional and dystopian attitudes – for the moment.  However, with good people planning…  

So, as the late Louisiana congresswoman Lindy Boggs said to Nancy Pelosi, current Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, ‘Darlin’, know thy power and use it.’  

To the good people who are sick and tired of the nastiness and toxic nature of instant media, politics and social discourse, know thy power and use it.  That will help to make 2020 a better world than we’ve experienced in 2019.  

Start planning.  

Now. 

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

There is no such thing as ‘Just a cat.’

There is no such thing as ‘Just a cat.’

That’s a quote from Robert Heinlein.  Here’s another, ’Never try to out stubborn a cat.’  That was from his book ‘Time enough for love.’  Interesting book that, with its views of living almost for ever and other somewhat challenging ideas for that time as well as ours.  So it goes… (You need to know about the Tralfamadorians to understand that last bit – plus, it’s me being a bit of a smart arse.)  

Anyway, to continue, I’ve read many of his books and feel they are unique, a bit disquieting in some cases, but always original, I like original.  He also wrote:  

‘Sick cultures show a complex of symptoms…but a dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than a riot.’  

This symptom is especially serious in that an individual displaying it never thinks of it as a sign of ill health but as proof of his / her strength…’  Robert A. Heinlein ‘Friday’  

Written in 1982, a wee while ago methinks, eh?  

Let’s bring it up to date a tad.  Regarding sick cultures and a dying culture.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners…  Bad manners, lack of consideration for others in minor matters…  Anyone, any leader of a country (plural) come to mind?  I thought so.  Me too.  

Currently we have the 45th incumbent in the White House facing impeachment.  In the UK we have the 77th Prime Minister of the UK voted in by 92,153 members of his party, no-one else, just his party.  The latter isn’t doing so well is he?  He’s losing vote after vote and has been unanimously excoriated by all eleven judges of the highest court in the land regarding his proroguing of Parliament.  No matter what, he continues to go his own way, ignoring the normal standards of political discourse.  With both of these ‘leaders’ it’s about them, and only about them.  Their language inflames rather than leads.  

Bad manners, loss of politeness.  

The misuse of words such as surrender, or enemy rather than opponent.   

As I wrote in a blog in January 2018, ‘Interesting word, enemy.  Having been in the military, the word invariably means someone we have to dehumanise since we may have to kill them.  Those who disagree with me are not my enemy, they are my opponent, a different thing entirely.  I don’t want to kill my opponents.  I don’t want to disrespect my opponents.  Unfortunately, we are now in a world where balance is no longer respected, vituperation rules and reasoned debate mocked.’  

No longer are we polite when we disagree.  We see people trying to draw blood, literally, when they confront each other – on the street, on instant media, the press, television.  Egged on by their fury, anger, hatred, misunderstanding, and by a media that uses them as the product, (remember, if it’s free then you are the product.)  

Unless we regain that politeness, civility, call it what you will, then one day perhaps there’ll be blood drawn for real on a massive scale.  Led by those who have never seen the horror that is violence.  Led by those who will make sure that they and theirs will never pay the price for causing that violence.  

Finally, can we please stop comparing Trump with Hitler.  It’s wrong to do so.  So very wrong.    

Hitler fought for his country.  

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

Let’s give it up for the strong women in this world

Let’s give it up for the strong women in this world

I was going to make this blog about what Eisenhower called the ‘military-industrial complex’ and the control / damage it has done to the body politic.  

‘In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes.’

He said this on leaving office in January 1961.  Still resonates today doesn’t it?  

However I received some news from the wife of a long time friend of mine that he had to go into hospital to ‘have some shit scooped out of his head.’  (She’s a nurse so she’s allowed.)  The operation was a success and the love of her life came home within 48 hours.  Within minutes of arriving home, his head, out of which he’d had ‘some shit scooped’, was under the bonnet of their daughter’s car aiming to change the thermostat.  ‘Dumb shit’ was one comment from the love of his life, (she’s a nurse so she’s allowed), before she marched him back inside.  A woman with attitude.  A strong woman.  

Then there’s another woman whom I admire.  A ‘softer’ version of the one above but equally strong in her beliefs.  This is a woman who went on a one day course to learn about what’s involved in feeding homeless people so that she could become active in a local initiative; spending time in contributing to the social cohesion of the area in which she lives; making many lives that bit better.  A deeply caring woman.  A strong woman.  

Then there’s the woman with whom I live.  The love of my life.  The one who was strong enough to make me realise there was a better me; who contributed to the development of others in her professional life; and who now contributes to the enjoyment of others via her art.  An articulate, wickedly funny woman.  A strong woman.  

Then there are the strong women who stand up to those in power whom they feel are usurping the democracy that elected them to office.  These are the four Congress women, also known as The Squad, who are facing up to the bullying of what I now call the Teflon Don.  They’re not blinking.  Strong women all.  

None of the women I have mentioned and admire blink.  They stand up for what they believe in.  We are blessed by having such women in our lives, and life.  

So, let me repeat, let’s give it up for the strong women in this world.  We are better people because of them.  Our world(s) are better because of them. 

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’ 

 

‘You came into their temple,’ he said. ‘And shat on their altar.’

‘You came into their temple,’ he said. ‘And shat on their altar.’

As all my readers will know, (okay, both of you) 😊  I left Twitter and Facebook some time ago.  I’d grown tired of their lies, amoral behaviour and the damage they have done to our world, our heritage, our common humanity.  Both monetise information they are given for nothing by those who use their publications, (remember, they’re not platforms), and allow people who don’t have the courage to say things to your face to spew out their vitriol.  Without penalty.  

(Oh, by the way, can we stop using the term ‘social media’.  Social media seems so much more legitimate don’t you think?  Let’s call them what they really are,  instant media’.)

One of instant media’s most informed critics is Carole Cadwalladr.  In her article she writes about her TED talk and ‘how I took on the tech titans in their lair.’  Excellent article, well written and researched.  As it says at the top of the article, ‘For more than a year, the Observer writer has been probing a darkness at the heart of Silicon Valley.  And, oh, what a dark heart it has.  

(A summary on YouTube of what she said can be seen here:  ‘Your technology is a crime scene’)

This particularly resonated, ‘I did tell them that they had facilitated multiple crimes in the EU referendum. That as things stood, I didn’t think it was possible to have free and fair elections ever again. That liberal democracy was broken. And they had broke it.  They were called to account for the first time in their lives in the Temple of TED.  As one attendee put it, ‘you came into their temple and shat on their altar.’  Quite so. 

Cadwalladr also named the people enabling this vitriol.  She named them, these Gods of Silicon Valley:  Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, Larry Page, Sergey Brin and Jack Dorsey.  Look ‘em up.  They and their instant media organisations remain what they really are – amoral and irresponsible.  All were offered the right of reply – none took it up.  One can only wonder why…  

If you want to read more about her work and the likes of Facebook and Twitter, have a look at her report on Cambridge Analytica.  Sublime.

Cadwalladr also spoke about Parliament’s comments on Facebook during an LBC interview.  Again, insightful.  Talking of Government, Parliament is discussing sanctions against these publishers as is the EU.  

Pushback is also coming from directions you wouldn’t necessarily expect.  In a recent op-ed in the New York Times, one of the co-founders of Facebook, Chris Hughes, argues that Facebook should be broken up.  It is a ‘monopoly without oversight.’   Mark Zuckerberg cannot fix Facebook, but our government can…’ 

(Btw, Zuckerberg owns Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp.  Think about it, all that power in the hands of one individual.  Without responsibility.  Hmmm.)  

That pushback is happening is not before time.  That instant media is now a danger to our democracy is becoming manifest.  That something needs to be done is clear.  That we need to treat these publishers like every other publisher, i.e. make them responsible for the content posted, is beyond doubt.  

If you think I’m being melodramatic about the dangers of instant media, read The dangers of digital politics.’  ’Twitter usage is positively correlated to narcissism and Machiavelliansim.  This is not where the commons should live. 

‘This is not where the commons should live.’  What a lovely phrase, I couldn’t have put it better myself.  The commons in which we live should reflect our social values, our common humanity, not the ‘world’ these ‘Gods of Silicon Valley’ have created – all in the name of making profit.  No matter what the cost to the rest of us.  

No matter what the cost.  To the rest of us…  

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’