This far and no further

This far and no further

I’m beginning the third volume of the Kold Kronicles trilogy.  As you do when writing fantasy, you think about battles, war-fighting, using viruses as an economic as well as physical weapon, y’know, the kind of thing that writing fantasy allows you to do because it’ll never happen.  The characters who are on the good side need to be brave since they could end up losing their life or badly damaged, physically as well as mentally.  It started me thinking about what’s meant by bravery and the form it might take in this day and age.  

There are many types of bravery, on the field of battle, or those private, dark night of the soul moments.  It might be an individual standing up to power or a member of a group going against the majority view.  

I have become aware that many brave acts tend to be driven by personal values.  The individual feels they will be a lesser person if they do not act.  The outcome of such bravery is that, invariably, they are mocked, pilloried and bullied in such a way as to try to intimidate them and others.  

As for bullying, here’s a definition I can work with: 

‘Persistent, offensive, abusive, intimidating,  malicious or insulting behaviour, abuse of power or unfair penal sanctions, which makes the recipient feel upset, threatened, humiliated or vulnerable, which undermines their self-confidence and which may cause them to suffer stress.’

Anyone in the White House come to mind?  

Bullies need to be confronted, and hard.  If you don’t, they feel empowered to double down and become even more of a threat to others, their behaviour even more egregious.  Perhaps Captain Jean-Luc Picard in ‘Star Trek:  First Contact’ had it right when he said of fighting the Borg:  

‘We’ve made too many compromises already.  Too many retreats.  They invade our space, and we fall back.  They assimilate entire worlds, and we fall back.  Not again.  The line must be drawn here!  This far and no further.’  

So, to The Squad;  Mitt Romney;  Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch;  Lieutenant Colonel Alexander S Vindman;  the impeachment prosecution team who resigned in disgust at Attorney General Barr’s behaviour;  the former Conservatives who stood up to the UK’s current Prime Minister and his homunculus of an adviser;  to you and so many others, confront, hold fast, counter attack.  

This far and no further.  

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

 

Know thy power and use it

Know thy power and use it

Interesting thing, power.  

Many moons ago I analysed, changed if necessary, a number of organisations, teams and individuals.   What I found really interesting was that the teams and organisations that were the most effective were invariably lead by those who didn’t want the role, the power.  Think about that for a moment, the leaders didn’t want the role but, as one person put it to me, ‘I had to step up or else we’d have gone down the tubes.  People would have lost their jobs, and I just couldn’t allow that to happen.  It wasn’t right, so I took the job.’  

Obviously I’m drawing a parallel between the current Prime Minister of the UK and his even more dysfunctional equivalent in the White House.  Even as a child, Johnson talked about wanting to be ‘King of the World.’  Both Johnson and Trump lied, coarsened debate, created hatred and division, obfuscated, bloviated and blustered their way to their current role.  Both put into power by out of date and undemocratic processes.  In the case of Johnson, voted into the role of the Conservative leader by 0.09% of the population, aka, the Conservative and Unionist Party membership.  Then, with 43% of the popular vote, his party achieved 53% of the seats with an 80 seat majority.  In the US, due to the Electoral College, the winner of the popular vote by over three million votes lost to the person who currently sits behind the Resolute desk.  Democracy, donchajustlurvit?  

Then let’s add that it took on average 38,264 votes to elect a Tory MP and 50,835 per Labour MP.  It’s even worse for the smaller political parties.  That First Past The Post is past its sell by date is confirmed yet again.  As is the Electoral College in the US.  However, interested parties, and all are complicit in both the UK and US, seem unable or unwilling to move away from a process that is patently undemocratic.  Democracy, donchajustlurvit?  

As for democracy, to those who complain about there being too many elections, people died to provide you with the right to vote;  to those who decided not to vote, you have abrogated the right to complain about what is happening;  to those who did vote and want to do something about confronting what has happened, then plan.  Yes, of course there will be frustration, anger, some will be in despair.  Well, enough now.  Breath deep, smile and remember that this too shall soon pass.  And plan.  

To use a quote I read in a recent Big Issue, ‘when evil people plot, good people plan.’  We have seen the plotting, the iron control of the message from both Johnson and Trump.  Their respective parties now mirror their own dysfunctional and dystopian attitudes – for the moment.  However, with good people planning…  

So, as the late Louisiana congresswoman Lindy Boggs said to Nancy Pelosi, current Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, ‘Darlin’, know thy power and use it.’  

To the good people who are sick and tired of the nastiness and toxic nature of instant media, politics and social discourse, know thy power and use it.  That will help to make 2020 a better world than we’ve experienced in 2019.  

Start planning.  

Now. 

J J Mitchell

‘No one left behind’

In a world of chaos, ‘normal’ won’t fix it

In a world of chaos, ‘normal’ won’t fix it

As an inkster who writes about things various and whose book uses fantasy as a vehicle to sometimes show what’s happening in the world today, I continue to be fascinated by what’s occurring in the world of politics, both here in the UK and Europe but also, obviously, in the United States. Many moons ago, I was heavily involved in organisational change.  This included supporting those impacted by the changes that were being initiated.  Some welcomed change, others had genuine concerns, whilst a small number were hostile to the extent of being deliberately obstructive.  The reason for this was they felt that change impacted their ‘version’ of reality, values, self esteem, authority, and so on. 

Change invariably involves chaos, especially at the beginning of any change programme, hence my interest in chaos theory.  Do a quick search on the web and you’ll come across a number of definitions. 

For example:  The main idea of chaos theory is that a minor difference at the start of a process can make a major change in it as time progresses.’

Here’s another: Chaos theory is a mathematical theory that can be used to explain complex systems such as weather, astronomy, politics, and economics. Although many complex systems appear to behave in a random manner, chaos theory shows that, in reality, there is an underlying order that is difficult to see.’

‘Politics and economics…’  Hmmm.  This appeals. 

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Forgetfulness – the real cost of war

Forgetfulness – the real cost of war

Well, it’s an interesting time in the world, that’s for sure.  We have POTUS 45, who railed against POTUS 44 for even considering the use of missiles against Syria, authorising the use of 59 cruise missiles to attack the Syrian airbase of Al-Shayrat.  Each missile has a unit cost of $1.8 million, thus $106.2 million in total for the missiles alone.  Now, let me make this clear, whoever authorised the sarin gas attack committed an obscene war crime.  Something had to be done, but the question is, what?

Looking at the reasons for the non-action of POTUS 44 in Syria, research soon shows that analysis was undertaken over weeks, sometimes months.  Those involved were experts of the political quagmire that is the Middle East; those who understood the tribal and religious complexities involved; military men and women who were aware of the operational environment into which they might be drawn – and, even more importantly – how mission creep can occur.  All understood and debated the cost, actual and potential, of such actions.  

POTUS 45, on the other hand,  talked about ‘beautiful babies’, children, and women and then authorised the use of missiles.  

In sum, the world has an emotionally unstable, emotion-led individual in a position of authority who can authorise the use of force without having to ask anyone’s permission to do so.  That he can do it again, (North Korea comes to mind); that he can be led by what he sees on Twitter rather than by the experts whose role is to advise him;  that he can do this based on an ‘emotional spasm’; and finally, that many believe in his fantasy, is a real cause for concern.  We can only wait and see where POTUS 45 will lash out next.  And, trust me, he will… 

Now, let me clarify why I have such concerns about this operation, and there are a number.  The first is that there was no analysis, it was knee-jerk;  second, insufficient consideration was given to the sarin attack being, potentially, a ‘false-flag’ operation – or not;  third, this was done without the involvement of Congress, in fact side-lining them; finally and most importantly, there does not appear to be a ‘well, what happens next?’ plan.  It is interesting to note that within hours of the final missile strike, Assad’s airforce was flying from the airbase concerned.  

Now, that’s ‘merely’ the military / political element of this blog.  We have yet to discuss the social / economic costs.  Invariably, there is a cost, a cost of increased hatred between people of different nations; the social cost of hatred between communities; the economic impact on social programmes since money is being spent on weaponry rather than people and infrastructure. 

However, what is particularly worrying, is that months from now, people will need to be reminded of this particular event, since, with the atrocities that are occurring so frequently around the world, this is ‘merely’ one more.  That many forget such things is the real cost of war. 

J Mitchell

‘Never leave anyone behind…’